ABOUT


ORME-WHO? ORME-WHAT? ORMEWOOD!

It starts when you give directions to your home. “Well,” you say, “do you know where Ormewood Park is?” “Uh, no, uh, not really” is often the reply.

This kissing cousin of Grant Park and East Atlanta Village is one of the best-kept, friendliest, most attractive and easiest to find neighborhoods you’ve never heard of.   

We’re east of Grant Park, south of Reynoldstown and west of East Atlanta.

We’re a Beltline neighborhood, with new construction single family homes, condos and apartments rapidly adding residents to our roster.  In addition, new commercial developments in the area bring great interest to the community and the surrounding area – developments like Atlanta Dairies, Larkin and The Beacon.

Ormewood Park is home to great schools, with both traditional public and charter school options for our families.  In fact, Maynard Jackson High School has been a “rising star” in the Atlanta Public School System, graduating IB students and sporting Georgia’s Principal of the Year, Stephanie Johnson, in 2016.

You’ll see Ormewood residents walking dogs, pushing baby strollers, running along tree-lined streets, biking to Kroger and working out in the yard on any given day in the community.

But we’re much more than pretty faces on the Beltline. We have a rich history, too.

A trolley line extension, like the one that took Atlantans to Inman Park, was built in 1891.  The Metropolitan Street Railroad Company ran the line north-south along Underwood Avenue, from Confederate Avenue and the Confederate Soldiers' Home. The line turned east on Delaware Avenue and then connected to the line that ran along Moreland Avenue, ending in downtown Atlanta. When you visit Ormewood Park, take a look at the wall angles of the commercial buildings at the northeast corner Woodland and Delaware; the trolley path can still be seen. Retail developments at the Ormewood and Moreland intersection – Little Azio’s and Morelli’s Ice Cream, among them – make use of this old path by providing rear access along the old right-of-way and bridge.

Ormewood Park was developed in 1892

After World War I the neighborhood – like so many others – experienced a construction boom.  Prefab and Sears catalog homes from this era still survive. In 1922, the City of Atlanta built Anne E. West Elementary School in the heart of Ormewood Park. Today it serves as the middle school campus of the popular Atlanta Neighborhood Charter School.

Now you know Ormewood Park.  Join us at our Meet the Makers Festival!

Our event will provide an opportunity for people to gather, connect as a community, and celebrate innovators, creators and designers, crafters, educators, tinkerers, food artisans, hobbyists, engineers and artists – it’s part arts festival, part crafts fair, and part something new! 

Makers come to show their creations and share what they know. Attendees find the inspiration to become makers themselves. It is a platform for people who explore the magic of DIY.

Join us as the city's most creative people and their projects gather together

Interaction is the key to our festival’s success. Could you be, or do you know someone who could be, a maker providing demonstrations, workshops, make-and-takes, presentations or other related activity? Let us know ASAP. Click the Vendor Application link and fill it out.